Friday, August 25, 2006

On endings and beginnings

This Sunday marks the series finale of Deadwood, and that makes me sad. I will miss you, Deadwood. You and your swears and your delightfully overwrought dialogue.

But I can't let that get me down because now I've got Wire fever!

Emory and Leslie have been working their way back through the first season, and I've been watching when I can. That scene near the end between D'Angelo and Stringer ("Where Wallace at? Where's the boy, String?") get me EVERY TIME.

And here's series co-creator David Simon on what the series has covered so far and what they hope to do with the new season:

"The first season was about the inherent cost of being an individual in any modern institution," Simon says. "Whoever you were in Baltimore, you were getting fucked. The second season was to describe the death of work. The third season was to show what happens to reform and reformers and to examine the whole nature of why policy never changes."

"And this season is to take argument with those who feel that if you're born without privilege, but make the right set of choices, that you will be spared. To do away with that bit of national mythology."

Damn, Simon! Don’t hold back! Say what you feel, man!

4 Comments:

Blogger Matt said...

That scene with D'Angelo and Stringer is heartbreaking.

My most enjoyed scene from season one is where McNulty and Bunk walk around that kitchen figuring out how that girl got shot and just keep saying "fuck" and "motherfucker" over and over again.

3:28 PM  
Anonymous Julia said...

"And this season is to take argument with those who feel that if you're born without privilege, but make the right set of choices, that you will be spared. To do away with that bit of national mythology."

What a fatuous twat.

Honestly.

8:04 PM  
Blogger chris said...

does seem a bit fatalist, doesn't it?

1:11 AM  
Blogger Jeff said...

There's no denying that Simon's a bit of a prick. Trust me, I've read enough interviews with the man. But he makes the best show on TV.

As for more stuff about the new season, here's an interview with series co-creator Ed Burns, who was a cop in Baltimore for 20 years and then a teacher for seven. It's his own experiences which inform much of The Wire.

The show itself can be grim, certainly. I mean, it is a show focusing on Baltimore's drug trade. But it's mostly about good people making the best of a bad situation.

9:13 AM  

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